Thursday, December 14, 2017

Music

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Loft Kolasiński


Photo Courtesy Of Loft Kolasiński

WHAT IS THE LOFT KOLASIŃSKI?
An interior and industrial design studio.

WHEN WAS IT FOUNDED?
In 2010.

WHO IS OR ARE ITS FOUNDERS?
It was founded by Jacek Kolasiński.

WHERE IS THE STUDIO LOCATED?
Main office is in Szczecin, and the second in Berlin.

WHY INTERIOR DESIGN?
Furniture, art, architecture, crafts, etc, has always been in sphere of interest of Jacek Kolasiński.

WHAT IS THE OVERRIDING AESTHETIC?
I would describe it as unique "Loft Kolasinski style" - full of great design, custom designed and produced items, timeless design from mid-century, natural structures and textures.

HOW DO YOU SOURCE PIECES?
In the field of furniture and vintage equipment we use contacts throughout Europe, friendly dealers and collectors often provide us with unique copies of lamps, furniture.

WHAT IS THE CREATIVE PROCESS?
Everything is in our heads.

WHAT ART MOVEMENT SERVES AS THE BIGGEST INFLUENCE?
We are mainly inspired by architecture, art, design created in the '20s and 7'0s. Especially bauhaus, Japanese style wabi sabi. We highly appreciate modernism, especially Brazilian. The design of Loft Kolasiński is also influenced by  Scandinavian design, especially from the 1950s and 1960s. Also from Central Europe between the '50s and '60s (Poland, Czech Republic) despite the communist regime.

WHAT FACTORS SHOULD ONE CONSIDER WHEN FURNISHING A HOUSE OR ROOM?
Textures and details makes the biggest difference.

Room Porn

Photo Courtesy Of Loft Kolasiński

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Amanda Gorman

Photo Courtesy Of Amanda Gorman 

WHERE ARE YOU RIGHT NOW AND HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED THERE?
Cambridge, Massachusetts. I came here to study at Harvard University in 2016.

WHERE WERE YOU BORN AND RAISED?
I was born and raised in Los Angeles, California.

WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR CITY OR HOMETOWN?
I love the diversity and inclusivity of Los Angeles. It’s a hub of artists and storytellers, which I love, and it’s so incredibly vibrant. I also love the geography - I can take the freeway to the mountains, to the ocean, or to the nearby Grapevine valley.

WHAT WERE YOUR ASPIRATIONS GROWING UP?
I always wanted to be an artist. I knew I wanted to do something creative. At first I dreamed of becoming  a visual artist. I loved painting, especially with watercolors. Soon I realized that painting was a way for me to visually depict the stories I wanted to write. So every now and then I’ll sketch an image to sum up the ideas or characters for a written piece, but I spend most of my time writing.

WHY POET?
I often say that poetry is a form of rebellion in itself. Poetry for me is a way to dance outside traditional expectations of prose and also to explore a writing form that is so rooted in spoken word and performance. It’s captivating all around.

WHAT IS YOUR EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND?
I spent kindergarten through high school senior year at New Roads school, a progressive school in Los Angeles, California. It really prepared me to think critically of the world and information around me, and to push myself to be an active member in whatever community I exist in. Now I go to Harvard University, where I study Sociology and English. I love Harvard, there’s so much knowledge and wisdom at my fingertips, from the game-changing professors to my fellow students.

WHAT'S YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?
My creative process is very repetitive. I need tradition to get material from myself habitually. If it’s not too cold, usually I go to the river, grab a seat, and write in my journal while listening to music. Before hand, I like to write down interesting words I heard that day in conversation, on street signs, in other poems, and see if they can find an organization place in a new poem. But I definitely like being around nature when I can while writing.

WHAT THEMES DO YOU SEEK TO EVOKE?
That depends on each poem. I try to explore themes of social and environmental justices self-reflection, identity, history, etc. Many a time it’s not what I want to evoke in my reader, but what I want to evoke in myself. What do I want to rethink?

WHO OR WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCE?
The strong women I’m surrounded by have always been a great influence on me. From my mother and my sister to my writing mentors, I’m surrounded by a clan of confident and kind women who have always encouraged me to go after my dreams.

HOW DOES YOUR ARTISTIC EXPRESSION TRANSLATE IN DIFFERENT AREAS OF YOUR LIFE? 
 It’s definitely in my veins to always think creatively. Sophia Amoruso says when you’re making a smoothie, try to make it the best smoothie ever, and that’s something I agree with all across life. Whenever I’m in the dining hall, I’m thinking of new ways to combine the food set out. My friends always laugh at how creative and gourmet-looking my plate seems! Or, even in Sociology class, I’m always thinking of what metaphors I can use to better describe my theories, or what visual representations can best get my analysis across in Government classes.

WHAT BEAUTY ROUTINE DO YOU SWEAR BY?
I love the song "You’re Never Truly Dressed Without a Smile" from "Annie". When I’m stressed, I have terrible break outs. So I first try to keep up a regimen of self-care that helps me feel pampered. Moisturizing face masks and scrubs, soothing face cleansers. Applying these actually help calm me, some. I’m accomplishing two things, soothing myself and my face.

WHAT DO YOU GET UP TO OUTSIDE OF YOUR STUDIES?
 I love reading, when I can. Also hanging out with friends is always fun, we love putting on a cheesy movie and watching it together in the dorm.

HOW DO YOU RETURN TO CENTER?
I meditate. I'm obsessed with the soundtracks to film - instrumental music, since it doesn't have lyrics, helps me focus on my own thoughts in a really intuitive level. There's nothing better than closing my eyes and listening to a beautiful score by Hans Zimmer or Michael Giacchino.

Friday, December 1, 2017

The Distortion Of Beauty


Photo Courtesy Of The Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum and Memorial

Behold "The Four Graces" painted by an unknown prisoner of Auschwitz. It makes one wonder what condition it takes to create such a striking element as great art comes from great pain, presumably, right? Or is that the myth of the tortured artist? No, not here. And sadly or gladly - depending on which lens you're looking through - there's more where this came from.

To satisfy their seemingly endless craving for the implementation of human creative mastery and imagination, and to enable a staple stream of unsalaried artwork, the Schutzstaffel, better known as SS would maintain a list, of those trapped in their killing machine, who had graduated from the top schools of fine arts in the Northern Hemisphere.

Despairing.

On a more cheerful note, however, objects created by and/or belonging to the victims and survivors of the Shoah are about to be displayed on a large scale.

"Not Long Ago. Not Far Away" - a travelling exhibition dedicated to the Nazi concentration camp and its historical significance debuts today in Madrid, Spain. The items of interest will tour 14 cities around seven countries in Europe and North America respectively. What's more, considering the turbulent times we live in, it must all be seen.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Lauren Sweetser

Photo Courtesy Of Lauren Sweetser

WHERE ARE YOUR RIGHT NOW AND HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED THERE?

Main residence is in Los Angeles. I am currently in Fort Smith, AR shooting a feature film.

WHERE WERE YOU BORN AND RAISED?

Fayetteville, AR.

WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR CITY OR HOMETOWN?

There are so many great things about Fayetteville. I would say the best thing about Fayetteville is the pride for the Razorback football games. 

WHAT WERE YOUR INFANT ASPIRATIONS?
I wanted to be an Olympic gymnast. 

WHY THESPIAN?
I chose to be an actor because I love telling stories. I'm a dancer and musician as well, so storytelling has been a part of my life for a long time. 

WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND TRAINING?
I have a BFA in Theatre Performance from Missouri State University. But I've found that the best training is real life onset experience. 

HOW DO YOU PREPARE FOR A ROLE AND HOW DID YOU PREPARE FOR "ADDICTED" SPECIFICALLY?
When preparing for a role I research as much as possible about the subject matter and any experiences my character might be going through. For "ADDicted", I extensively researched addiction and how it affects physical and mental well-being. 

WHAT IS YOUR PREFERRED CINEMATIC GENRE?
Comedy. From an acting perspective, comedy is hard to do successfully. But, when someone gets it right there's nothing better. 

WHAT OR WHO HAS HAD THE GREATEST INFLUENCE ON YOU?
My parents because they set a great example of what it means to be a good human. They've always supported me in my endeavors in art. As I've gotten older I've realized how rare and special that is.  

HOW DO YOU GET RED CARPET READY AND HOW DOES YOUR AESTHETIC TRANSLATE IN OTHER AREAS OF YOUR LIFE?
 Depending on the event I may have a team of hair and make up people to help me, but overall I try to keep it pretty low-key. My personal style is pretty eclectic. It would probably be a mix of Restoration Hardware, Anthropologie, and vintage items. 

HOW DO YOU STAY IN SHAPE? 
At the risk of having some people hate me for this honest answer, I don't really have much of a work-out regimen. I love to eat!  I only run when someone is chasing me! However, I try to be mindful about what I put in my body.

WHAT BEAUTY ROUTINE DO YOU SWEAR BY?
Wash your face at night and in the morning!

HOW DO YOU SPEND A DAY OFF?
I like to sleep and catch up on my stories. 

HOW DO YOU UNWIND?
Snuggling with my dog and drinking wine! 

Master


Image Courtesy Of Paramount Pictures

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Kim Talon Of Kino Kimino

Photgraphed By Thomas Ignatius

WHERE ARE YOU RIGHT NOW AND HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED THERE?
I'm in my childhood bedroom in Winnipeg, Manitoba. However, I live in the U.S.

WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR PRESENT LOCATION OR HOMETOWN?
The best thing about my present location/hometown is the quiet and the clean air.

WHAT HAS BEEN A SEMINAL EXPERIENCE?
Being raised in an environment that encouraged creativity without judgement. I have no recollection of ever feeling shame (in my family) while experimenting with different artistic mediums. Exploration was encouraged. The freedom to create without speculation conditioned me to write freely, without beating myself up the whole time.

WHEN DID YOUR INTEREST IN MUSIC START?
Infancy.

WHEN AND WHERE DID YOUR BAND FIRST GET TOGETHER?
We met through friends in Brooklyn, we’ve been playing together for about a year.

WHERE'S THE BAND'S PRIMARY LOCATION?
Brooklyn.

HOW WOULD YOU CLASSIFY YOUR SOUND?
Hmm… It’s been described as melodic post-punk.

WHAT OR WHO HAS HAD THE GREATEST INFLUENCE ON YOU?
My mum and dad.

WHAT'S THE DIVISION OF LABOUR WITHIN THE GROUP?
Jordyn Blakely plays drums, Melissa Lucciola plays bass, Tarra Thiessen plays guitar, I play guitar and sing.

HOW DO YOU GET STAGE READY?
Most of us are pretty girly and all have our individual rituals. When it comes to fashion, my first rule is comfort, both on and off stage. To get ready for the stage, I search out light weight pieces that move easily and won’t get caught in my guitar strap. Stage lights can get really hot, so I try to wear as little as possible without breaking the law. The goal is to feel physically free, open to my audiences and completely unrestrained by what I’m wearing. I’m usually playing an instrument on stage, so I always pull my hair back before a show. I can’t be bothered with hair in the face even though hair down seems to work better for rock’n'roll.

HOW DO YOU RETURN TO CENTER?
After a show it’s always hard to wind down, especially on tour. If we’re on tour I’ll take melatonin before bed to strip away the spinning thoughts/caffeinated feeling that lingers after being on stage. For New York shows, I’ll try to get home and into pyjamas as soon as possible and attempt to relax with carbohydrates. A shower always helps melt away the energy picked up from other people at the shows. I find that water and eucalyptus salts kind of washes away the ambience of other people’s sweat glands, alcohol and psychic noise. That said, it’s never easy to sleep after a show. One thing I try to avoid is listening to any more music before going to bed, that seems to ignite insomnia.