Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Paris

Photographed By Karen Burgos

De tout coeur.

Friday, April 12, 2019

Bob Fosse

Image Courtesy Of Paramount Pictures

Friday, April 5, 2019

Jasmine E. Redman (The 12-Year-Old Entrepreneur)

Photo Courtesy Of Jasmine E. Redman

WHERE ARE YOU RIGHT NOW AND HAVE YOU ALWAYS LIVED THERE?
I live in London and I have always lived here.
 

WHERE WERE YOU BORN AND RAISED? 
In Croydon, and raised near Shirley.

WHAT'S THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR PRESENT CITY OR HOMETOWN?
 I like all the shops and things to do.

WHAT ARE YOUR ASPIRATIONS THUS FAR? 
I want to become a famous artist and have my own TV show were I create art.

WHY ART?
Art relaxes me and leaves me in my own zone.

HOW DID YOU AQCUIRE THE SKILL?
I think I was born with it. But, I have had help from an art teacher and mentor over the years to help me progress. My mum is good at art, too.

WHAT IS YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?
Merissa inspires me to create art I have never done before, like sculpture, but my process comes in different forms depending on my mood. I will get out my sketch pad and doodle.

WHAT IS YOUR PREFERRED MEDIUM?
Making things using different materials. I do love drawing.

WHAT IS ADVENTUREVILLE?
It’s my business where I've created colouring books for children and adults alike.

WHO OR WHAT HAS HAD THE BIGGEST INFLUENCE ON YOU?
My parents as they have shown me not to give up and to follow my dreams no matter what

HOW DOES YOUR AESTHETIC TRANSLATE IN YOUR
PERSONAL STYLE?
I enjoy fashion and would like to do some modelling but also listening to music

WHAT DO YOU GET UP TO WHEN YOU'RE NOT WORKING?
I like to play on my PS4, go travelling with my family as I love
seeing new places and experiencing new things.

HOW DO YOU UNWIND?
I like to meditate or watch movies with my family.

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Leather On Leather

Image Courtesy Of NBC

Nobody does it better than Eddie Murphy.

Sunday, March 3, 2019

"Cleo Was His Cleo. His Mother Was His Mother." Anna Terrazas On Clothing Alfonso Cuarón's Memories In "Roma"

Photo Courtesy Of Esperanto Film/Participant Media

I have a plethora of questions I want to ask Anna Terrazas. On "Roma". On "The Deuce", where I later, and to my dismay, am informed she won't be returning for the final season. She just had a baby.

"I'm in Mexico City. Let me know what day will be good for you."

"I'm in CET - Central European Time. Are you on Skype? Or, what's your number?"

"We can do it on Wednesday in the afternoon or Thursday morning. Maybe Skype will be good?"

"Your afternoon? There's an eight hours difference. My 8 a.m and your 4 p.m.?"

It ends up the reverse. Terrazas has to take her son to a doctor's appointment at 5 p.m.

She's on location shooting yet discloses nothing about the upcoming project. "Eh, what genre?" Alas, I'm given the Alfonso Cuarón treatment. Nada. She's glad to be home, however, in the city she was born, then raised in a tiny mountain enclosed town, an hour away from. Mexico is home, although she's lived, studied and worked elsewhere.

After an idyllic childhood, Terrazas moves to London and pursues a foundation in Art and Design at Central Saint Martins. In 2003,  at the Parsons School of Design, she's described as "dazzlingly talented", with observers ancipating what the future would hold for her.

"I start working for Bill Blass in fashion, then I decided I wasn't really evolving in fashion and I wanted to do something else," says Terrazas adding that she went back to Mexico and was offered a job designing for the theatre. Ensuing this event, she met a director and started doing commercials which eventually saw her return to New York where she landed work on "Rudo y Cursi" (2008).  "And that is sort of how I got into the film industry."

Later Terazzas discovered her love for motion pictures exceeded creating costumes for the theatre. The posterity aspect being more appealing. Albeit, she enjoys the process either way.

Sourcing pieces for "The Deuce" was an easier task than finding images reflecting day to day wear of the characters in "Roma". Terazzas also had to train her eye in order to transfer blue and red to the perfect shade of grey, while at the same portraying differences in the social class structure of 1960's Mexico. Certain levels of fashion could only be seen on the affluent as Terrazas remarks, "People couldn'the afford what was coming from the U.S. It was super expensive."

Arrestingly, there's one scene where Terrazas didn't worry about finding the appropriate attire. It occured when Cuarón focused the lense on the male antagonist stripped off his clothes demonstrating vigour. Why nude?

"Yeah, Fermín, I know. I guess to show the toughness of the guy. Who he is. I don't know. I actually never thought about that before. I have no idea why he decided to do that."

Be that as it may, Terrazas is impressed with what they accomplished. The movie. What it made her feel. She cried and went through the emotions as Cleo went through them. "It was shocking. I knew what it was about. Seeing it for the first time...It took me somewhere else. I was surprised."

What's more, it was tough doing the fIlm. Cuarón is a tough. Working with him means you have to give it your 150, challenge yourself, and bring in new ideas. "It's such a personal film for him. In that sense everything had to be exactly how he remembered things and that was beautiful trying to recreate his memory," recalls Terrazas of the director who sat her down, told her a story without ever showing her the script.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Benicio Del Toro × Audrey Hepburn

Image Courtesy Of Alejandro Marco

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

How Important Are The Arts To Puerto Rico?

Photographed By Fernando Samalot

La Trinchera is a performance and dance collective based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was founded in 2015 by independent artists Beatriz Irizarry, Cristina Lugo and Marili Pizarro. The members met through working with Hincapié, the University of Puerto Rico's contemporary dance collective, under the direction of renowned choreographer Petra Bravo. In their years in Hincapié, and guided by Bravo’s mentorship, the Trinchera members had the opportunity to choreograph, design, direct, audition  dancers, and build the foundation for future artistic interests and style.

The triad of independent female Puertorican artists, each with their own style and body of work, have a common, yet diffused  artistic expression."La Trinchera varies in formats, usually oscillating and merging performance, contemporary dance and visual work," says Pizzaro and continues, "We regard our work as experimental because of our varied, alternate and intuitive methodology. We believe that each piece of work has its own process."

By conceiving dance differently from its construct and, or, process, they  "force" an organic and guaranteed uniqueness. The aim is to synthesize discipline and intuition as the pillars of their practice. "We are hungry for ways and formats of manifestation. We’re playing it by ear when it comes to offers and collaboration invites, we try to fit as much as possible in our schedule, all while we submit proposals to festivals and residencie. " Pizzaro elaborates that they have enjoyed all so far: from writing a manifesto, photo shoots, classically styled choreographies, art biennales, gallery interventions, site-specific dance-theatre and night club performing. In the near future, they aim to work more with video-art and would love to produce their next lengthy show later this year.

They explore specific themes as their work revolves around the use of the body and they're three independent latinx female artist living in what Pizzaro calls a severely repressed, colonial country. Their societal, political and community concerns are inevitably latent in their work. "We're inspired by everyday life as well as fantasy, punk aesthetics, DIY philosophy, Puertorican pop culture, trending apps and morbidity. We're willfully defiled by national politics as well as glitch art. No holding back, we try to feed from it all," says Pizzaro.

They live perform at an average of four times per month, for an approximate total of 48 presentations per year. This statistic doesn't include photo shoots, video work, community and table work and theme-based workshops. They have no consistent, systematical process. They change dynamics depending on time-frame, concept and on which of them is directing the project (if applicable, sometimes they all direct).

Art in a country like Puerto Rico is vital. Because the reigning local political parties are lenient with the colonial pettiness of the federal government, even representation is at risk. Art merges apparent contradictions, and this aesthetic force to feel and think different is necessary to evolve. Art-making and appreciation is a way of contextualizing the perplexities of character, culture, and relationships. It's also a form of escapism.

"All highly valuable, art has the power to reflect and, or, deflect our reigning interests. As a tool for change it's essential," proclaims Pizzaro with further professing her love of country, "Puerto Rico is always in our hearts, in our style and in our art."

Friday, February 15, 2019

In Search Of A Perfect Hoodie À La Laylow


Image Courtesy Of Laylow